Tag Archives: Archives

Important new contribution to interpreting The Troubles: Review of Thomas Leahy’s ‘The Intelligence War Against the IRA’

Thomas Leahy’s The Intelligence War Against the IRA is an important new contribution to the growing, and changing, interpretations of The Troubles. As the title suggests, the main thrust of Leahy’s book is an analysis of the intelligence war that … Continue reading

Posted in British Empire, British history, European History, Historiography, Irish History, Public History, Research, Secret State, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Past and Present: Why studying History tells us who we really are

In 2017 the historian Sir David Cannadine, in his capacity as president of the British Academy, made a strong and very welcome defence of the study of his subject, pointing out that the academic investigation of the past is necessary … Continue reading

Posted in British Empire, British history, European History, History skills, Media history, Public History, Research, Study Skills, Teaching, Uncategorized, World History | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Red Cross meets the Suffragettes via an Indian Princess

To help celebrate NursesDay2020, we republish this fascinating blog by Dr. Sue Hawkins. The Red Cross’s Voluntary Aid Detachments (VADs) from World War One have in the past been saddled with a popular public image something akin to the Women’s … Continue reading

Posted in Archives, British history, Gender History, History of Medicine, History of Nursing, Local History, London history, Medical History, Public History, Research, Surrey, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Digital Decay: Should historians be worried?

The problem of ‘digital decay’ could become a difficult challenge for historians in the future. We re-publish a piece on this tricky conundrum from April, 2015. Here’s a major technological challenge that might face the next generation of historians. Everybody … Continue reading

Posted in Archives, British history, European History, History skills, Kingston University, Local History, London history, Media history, Museums, Public History, Research, Study Skills, Teaching, World History | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

‘Non-political, Non-sectarian and Non-alcoholic’: Kew’s Victoria Working Men’s Club, 1910-1926

Special guest blog by professional researcher and local historian Simon Fowler Kew’s Victoria Working Men’s Club was founded in 1885 as a space for local working men to socialise away from the temptations of the public house. Its motto was … Continue reading

Posted in Archives, British history, Local History, London history, Public History, Research, Richmond history, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Past and Present: Why studying History tells us who we really are

In 2017 the historian Sir David Cannadine, in his capacity as president of the British Academy, made a strong and very welcome defence of the study of his subject, pointing out that the academic investigation of the past is necessary … Continue reading

Posted in British history, History skills, Media history, Public History, Research, Study Skills, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

In Praise of Python: the impact of a comedy classic on the 1970s

And now for something completely different. I am a major fan of Monty Python’s Flying Circus – I always have been, and always will be. In fact, I tend to lose any objectivity as a historian when it comes to … Continue reading

Posted in Archives, British history, Media history, Public History, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

A Future Based on the Past: the scholarly and career benefits of studying History at postgraduate level

Why study history at postgraduate level? What do the expert commentators say? Here at Kingston University the History team often point our applicants to a range of sources which explain the huge benefits of postgraduate history, either at taught-course level or … Continue reading

Posted in Archives, Blogging, British history, European History, Events, Gender History, Kingston, Kingston University, LGBT History, Local History, Media history, Public History, Research, Study Skills, Teaching, The National Archives, Uncategorized, World History | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment