Category Archives: Russian History

Rewriting history: Russia’s invention of an alternative Chernobyl story

It was a real pleasure to see the TV drama Chernobyl pick up a number of BAFTA 2020 TV awards last Friday, including one for Jared Harris, one of the lead actors in the series. The drama was arguably one … Continue reading

Posted in Conspiracy theory, European History, History skills, London history, Media history, Public History, Russian History, Teaching, Uncategorized, World History | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Clement Attlee and the Secret State: Recent evidence from British archives

As we recall the surprise election of Clement Attlee as Britain’s Prime Minister 75 years ago this summer, and his role in reconstructing Britain after the war, it is a good moment to also consider recent evidence on the more … Continue reading

Posted in Archives, British history, European History, Historiography, Public History, Russian History, Secret State, Teaching, The National Archives, Uncategorized, World History | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Spies and Lies: Another look at the Kim Philby story

The news that a major new television drama will be produced about the life of Kim Philby, the British Intelligence officer who engaged in treachery, will come as no surprise to historians of the secret state. The new production, A … Continue reading

Posted in Archives, British history, European History, Public History, Research, Russian History, Secret State, The National Archives, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Year of Upheaval: ‘Red’ 1920 in retrospect

It is often assumed that when the Armistice was signed in November, 1918, the world entered a period of relative peace. Yet, as a number of historians have pointed out, the following year – 1919 – proved to be a … Continue reading

Posted in American history, British history, European History, Fascism, French History, German History, London history, Public History, Research, Russian History, World History | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

After Hitler: Why did Nazi Germany fight on?

Seventy-five years ago, after Hitler’s suicide in his bunker in Berlin, his chosen successor, Grand-Admiral Donitz, was briefly the new leader of a Germany that, astonishingly, fought on for a few more days. Donitz did not concede defeat until 7th … Continue reading

Posted in European History, Fascism, German History, Public History, Research, Russian History, Teaching, Uncategorized, World History | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

From Russia With Hate: Looking back on Pamyat and other neo-fascists

Many moons ago, during the early 1990s, and not long after the surprise collapse of the Berlin Wall and Eastern Bloc Communism, I became increasingly interested in the emergence of far right groups in post-Soviet Russia, and – as a … Continue reading

Posted in Conspiracy theory, European History, Fascism, German History, Public History, Research, Russian History, Teaching, Uncategorized, World History | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The world-view of Nesta Webster: a case study in conspiracy theory

With the seeming surge in conspiracy theories during the current coronavirus crisis, it is important to be aware of the history of such views, and understand the claims of some of the ‘classic’ advocates of these paranoid and distorted interpretations … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Conspiracy theory, European History, French History, Gender History, German History, Media history, Public History, Research, Russian History, Uncategorized, World History | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The ‘Red’ Scare: middle-class fears of Bolshevism in south-west London, 1919-22

A little over one hundred years ago, in October, 1917 (depending upon which version of the calendar one uses) the Bolshevik party under Lenin achieved a dramatic seizure of power in key cities in Russia, a coup d’etat which sent a … Continue reading

Posted in British history, Conspiracy theory, European History, Kingston, Local History, London history, Public History, Research, Richmond history, Russian History, Surrey, Uncategorized, World History | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The authoritarian nature of Viktor Orban’s ‘illiberal democracy’: A historical perspective

One of the worrying consequences of the current coronavirus crisis is that leaders with authoritarian tendencies are using it as an opportunity to exploit the emergency and entrench their powers. Prime Minister Viktor Orban in Hungary is the latest stark … Continue reading

Posted in American history, British history, Conspiracy theory, European History, Fascism, Media history, Public History, Research, Russian History, Teaching, Uncategorized, World History | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Year of Upheaval: ‘Red’ 1920 in retrospect

It is often assumed that when the Armistice was signed in November, 1918, the world entered a period of relative peace. Yet, as a number of historians have pointed out, the following year – 1919 – proved to be a … Continue reading

Posted in American history, British history, European History, Fascism, French History, German History, Public History, Russian History, World History | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment